Sunday, March 17, 2019

The Tale of St. Siren

There once was a detectress so fine sir.
Siren Kimmie, they say, there's none wiser.
Till too much wine she did drink...
while hunting relics I think...
the lass dug her way straight down to Chiner.

--xoxo Siren Kimmie

Siren Kimmie (HDIC Girls Rock Metal Detecting)

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Copyright © 2019 Siren Kimmie (Kim Price) Girls Rock Metal Detecting. All Rights Reserved.

Tuesday, December 25, 2018

Baby It's Cold Outside (I'm Digging Today)


Join us in this metal detecting, wine sipping, Christmas caroling, sensational special. The Girls Rock Metal Detecting team recovers CW relics, silver coins, and other amazing artifacts as Siren Kimmie and Dean Martin pay homage to a Christmas classic, deemed controversial by some, but beloved here at GRMD--"Baby It's Cold Outside, I'm digging today!" Plus testing out the Detech Ultimate 13" coil on the Garrett AT Pro, and we shower gifts upon a lucking winner of the awesome digging accessory prize package chock full of goodies from Girls Rock Metal Detecting and The Digger's Den. Click Here: https://youtu.be/3-eHGjRNjII
Merry Christmas from Girls Rock Metal Detecting.

xoxo Siren Kimmie (HDIC Girls Rock Metal Detecting)

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Copyright © 2018 Siren Kimmie (Kim Price) Girls Rock Metal Detecting. All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, December 19, 2018

Detecting Moments

Today's adventure included a 1.5 hour drive to a historic 1901 property where I met a delightful older gentleman by the name of Charles.  

I stood on the grand front porch of this beautiful New Orleans style home as Charles slowly opened the large heavy door in response to my knocking.  With a smile on his face he quickly approved my request to detect his property and confessed to being a metal detectorist himself, as well as a Civil War reenactor.  

Charles was a friendly man with a very kind face, and all the while detecting his property he would pop out to talk.  He brought his finds, and was so obviously proud of his Civil War buckle, cannon ball frag, buttons, bullets, and other campsite goodies; thrilled to share them with someone who truly appreciates them. He later brought out his tablet showing aerial photographs he had taken of a nearby Civil War reenactment. We had a lovely time talking as I puttered around his property digging up one roofing nail after another. He placed them in a little jar--why he wanted them I do not know--other than as a memento of some sort; but I couldn't help but think he was as sentimental about detecting as I am.  And when he spoke of the passing of his dear wife I had an overwhelming feeling, during a time of year that must be very difficult for him, our visit had somehow brightened his day.

When it came time to leave, Charles insisted I take a little button from his finds stash that I had shown interest in, adding it to the only good bits I recovered from his yard--a little buckle and a 1930 wheat penny...

As it turns out, in metal detecting, sometimes the best finds are the moments spent with friends, new and old.

xoxo Siren Kimmie (HDIC Girls Rock Metal Detecting)


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Copyright © 2018 Siren Kimmie (Kim Price) Girls Rock Metal Detecting. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, November 10, 2018

One Ring To Dig Them All

IT'S HERE! The Fall Season Premiere of Girls Rock Metal Detecting's SIREN OF THE RINGS. Precious finds, revolutionary war history, unboxing the Garrett Zlink Wireless Kit, and Siren Kimmie detects the ONE RING TO RULE THEM ALL. You wont want to miss this digging adventure packed with silver, rings, relics, history and more. Grab a glass of wine or your favorite libation and get ready to YouTube and Chill with Siren Kimmie! xoxo

https://youtu.be/outHS9YWwjs




xoxo Siren Kimmie (HDIC Girls Rock Metal Detecting)

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Copyright © 2018 Siren Kimmie (Kim Price) Girls Rock Metal Detecting. All Rights Reserved.

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Be Illustrious

I don't want to be famous – Everyone feels entitled to judge your decisions.
I don't want to be a the top – Everyone questions your right to be there.
I don't want to be considered an "expert" – Everyone questions your skills.
I don't want to be considered a genius—There is always someone more intelligent to learn from.
I don't want to be considered beautiful based on looks – Beauty is subjective and changes with age.

If I am to be respected, let it be by those who deserve my respect in return.
If I am to be recognized let it be for my diplomacy and ability to see things from all sides.
If I am to be admired, admire my strength and tenacity.
If I am to be commended, commend my ability to have confidence without arrogance.
If I am to be applauded, applaud my ability to bring laughter in difficult circumstances.
If I am to be extolled, let it be for my fairness, honesty, and sincerity.
If I am to be praised, let it be for my kind heart, giving soul, and the love I extend.
If I am to be adored, let it be for my true character.

Should I be criticized, let it be from those with something constructive to offer.
Should I reach my goals, let it not be at the expense of others or my integrity.
Should I find happiness, let it be with my life, my choices, and the person I've become.
Should I find contentment, let it be with those I love, doing what brings me joy.

xoxo Siren Kimmie (HDIC Girls Rock Metal Detecting)

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Copyright © 2018 Siren Kimmie (Kim Price) Girls Rock Metal Detecting. All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Show Us Your Detecting Assets


I have been told on a few occasions that I am "an asset" to metal detecting, or a good "ambassador" of the hobby.  This is certainly a huge compliment which does not go unappreciated, believe me!  (On the flip side, I was also called a bad influence because someone felt my profile picture was too provocative—So, six of one half dozen of the other.)

This got me to thinking though; what does it mean to be an asset to the hobby of metal detecting?  To me, an asset would be, say--a kick ass set of wireless head phones, a machine that rules out pull tabs, or maybe even a really good sports bra? Something that greatly benefits the detectorist in a tangible way.

Meanwhile, the term ambassador, when taken literally means "spokesperson" or "promoter"…  Do we really feel metal detecting is in need of promotion or any sort of cheerleading squad?  Let's face it, attracting new detectorists to the hobby really only benefits those selling equipment or the individuals who receive dividends for endorsing said equipment. And more coils on the soil mean less relics for everyone—which isn't exactly advantageous to detectorists—but it does equate to more history being saved, so I'm okay with that.

When contemplating the terms "asset" and "ambassador", it is important to understand their context is confined to the metal detecting subculture born on social media; not the hobby itself. In other words, if I am found to be an asset or ambassador by the court of social media, I do not immediately "qualify" in the eyes of a landowner. 

Can you imagine a permission pitch based on testimonials like, "WaterDigger says I'm a cool chick" and "NuggetBrain thinks I'm the bomb!"?  Regardless of how many YouTube subscribers they may have; the landowner will stare blankly, scratch their head, and say, "Who???"  They are more impressed that I can offer references from their neighbors or someone well-respected in their local community.

The majority of landowners are simply not a part of the metal detecting subculture or its dialog.  So there isn't much chance someone will be holding up their hand saying, "Oh hey, before I let you detect I need to know where you stand in the long-time feud between FindsRecoverer and BadDiggahGal."  Because, in the real world no one really cares!!!  

And thank GOD for that. I would hate to have landowners basing my permission on DirtInvestigator's judgmental assault of my profile picture after his trousers suddenly tightened, or over someone questioning my "dedication" because I produce YouTube videos.

In reality, landowners are not interested that JoeConfederate is pouting over RelicGal's percussion cap having more likes than his box plate; or that he claims SlickSilverSally became popular by acting like a clown.  Nor does it matter what machine WesElite swings, whether someone has been accused of staging finds, or which detectorists are sleeping together. 

The point is, metal detecting doesn't have a "reputation".  It is not a living breathing thing (though it may often feel that way). And it would take a hell of a lot more than a little bit of Facebook drama to do any wide-spread damage to the hobby.  I'm more concerned over rolling up on a property after a landowner has watched a television show depicting targets dug with a backhoe, or having to apologize because some yay-hoo has left gaping holes all over the place.  

When I'm standing there with my shovel in hand the only thing the landowner really wants to know is whether I’m going to damage their property or steal something. 

Hashtag Are-you-going-to-kill-me-or-my-lawn!

Am I right?

It's too easy in this world of social media, with all its personalities, to wind up with an overdeveloped sense of self-importance. While certainly an online footprint can have far reaching consequences; in this situation one's virtual reputation doesn't factor.  What really matters is owning the traits that gained me the respect of those individuals who called me an "asset" or "ambassador" in the first place.  And while I may not agree with the terminology, I like to think the meaning stands for integrity, kindness, and being a decent human being as well as any skills I may have developed as a detectorist.

When we apply these traits by respecting property, rebuilding the trust of landowners who have had a bad experience, positively influencing newer detectorists, and reinforce good habits.--In these ways each one of us is an asset and ambassador of the hobby.  And that my friends far outshines any minor rumblings from the mythical dark side of detecting lurking in the distant corners of the internet.

xoxo Siren Kimmie (HDIC Girls Rock Metal Detecting)


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Friday, July 20, 2018

Professional Metal Detectorists?


The hobby of metal detecting is filled with people from all walks of life.  I myself am an Information Technology Professional.  To become an IT Pro, I had to go to school to learn the intricate workings of computers and software. I am a trained, certified professional in my field.  Correspondingly, teachers, nurses, doctors, dentists, have spent gobs of money on an education, not for a degree to hang on their wall, but to become skilled in their chosen profession.

Metal detecting on the other hand, requires no specialized training courses.  There is no college curriculum or certification program which can be completed to achieve the title of "Professional Metal Detectorist".  In fact, there is no distinct talent or ability needed to engage in the hobby.  Believe me, even those with horrible technique and the cheapest detectors, still manage to find amazing things and have a great time doing it!

While experience and knowledge are helpful, they are not essential. Deciphering tones and navigating trashy areas will come with time, but a new detectorist hunting a target rich location has just as much chance of finding that pot of gold as a 40 year veteran of the hobby.  In fact anyone can find a pot of gold, it's bloody big and the tone will blow your ears off!

When I hear the term "Professional Detectorist" tossed around, or am accused of being one myself, I cannot help but wrinkle my nose--It's a misnomer.  Calling a metal detectorist a professional is like saying a prostitute is a professional.  It's a learn-as-you-go sort of thing.  Sure, you may fumble around the first time or two, but eventually you'll figure it out.  You can certainly hone your skills by watching and learning from others who have been doing it longer, picking up tips and techniques from videos or books, and through simple trial and error.  But the more you do it and the more you learn your equipment the better you will become. It really is that simple!

xoxo Siren Kimmie (HDIC Girls Rock Metal Detecting)


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Copyright © 2018 Siren Kimmie (Kim Price) Girls Rock Metal Detecting. All Rights Reserved.